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Discover Fennel Bulb: Digestive Aid. Zesty Bite.

My fennel discovery. I have to admit that it wasn't until last year that I started experimenting with fennel. I initially tasted it shaved super thin in a raw salad at Mercer Kitchen, a Jean Georges restaurant in NYC. But after a few rounds of fennel recipes and experimenting on my own, I was hooked. Not only do I love the zesty palate-cleansing taste of raw fennel bulb, but this celery-esque white bulb is tasty and healthy. It's low in calories (only 27 calories per cup) and high in fiber. It's also been called the ultimate digestive aid veggie. And my happy tummy has to agree...


I love Fennel. I do. It combines the satisfying crunchiness of celery or carrots with the robust flavor of a bold lovely spice. Fennel is tender yet crisp, and mellow yet robust in anise flavor. Aka, licorice flavor. My favorite way to eat fennel is to thinly slice it raw right into my salads. But there are more than a few ways to prepare it.

Fennel Recipes.
Try it in place of cabbage in a Fennel cole slaw. You can also braise it with olive oil and garlic. Shave it super thin and marinate it in lemon juice and olive oil. Or try it sauteed with tofu and black pepper. They often say that fennel goes perfectly with fish like salmon. Well for veggies like me, I've found that fennel goes very well with mellow grains like quinoa and couscous, tofu, tempeh and even seitan.

But fennel isn't all about flavor. It is a nutrition superfood!

Fennel for digestion. Numerous doctors and health professionals often recommend trying fennel for moderate digestive ailments. You can chew fennel seeds, drink fennel seed tea or do what I do: simply eat some raw fennel. Fennel aides in digestion by using its stimulating properties. There's nothing worse than a sluggish, slow and unhappy digestive tract.

Fennel Nutrition Facts
from Nutritiondata.com
*per one cup of fennel

calories: 27
fat: 0
carbs: 6g
protein: 1g
fiber: 3g
Vitamin C: 17% RDA
Potassium: 10% RDA
Manganese: 8% RDA
Folate: 6% RDA

Nutrition Summary:
Fennel is low in calories and high in fiber. It is also a good source of potassium and vitamin C.

To Fennel or Not to Fennel?
Great nutrition profile. Super flavorful. Easy to find at the supermarket. Not too expensive. Add in the digestion-easing effects of fennel and you have a truly appealing ingredient to add to your culinary repertoire.





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